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Deke's Techniques 64: Creating a Star Wars Hologram Effect in Photoshop CS6

Deke's Techniques 64: Creating a Star Wars Hologram Effect

As if to prove to one and all how relevant I am, this week I do two things: I show you how to create a Star Wars hologram effect, circa 1976. And I do so in Photoshop CS6, circa last Wednesday. Never let it be said that I'm not the absolute embodiment of au courant, regardless of how stupidly old I am! Granted, I start this week's video with the words far-flung when everyone knows the line is far, far away. But that's for a very good reason. Which is that I . . . er . . . I'm sorry, was I talking or were you?

Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 028: Adding Stereo-3D Text and Shapes

Deke's Techniques 028: Adding Stereo-3D Text and Shapes

Hey gang. This week's Deke's Techniques videos are all about adding text and shapes to a 3D stereoscopic photograph, like the one created in last week's technique. In today's free movie, I show you how to add text and shapes at different planes of depth. In the follow-up video at lynda.com, I show you how to tilt the text and shapes so they incline in 3D space toward the viewer.

Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 027: Making a Stereoscopic Photo

Deke's Techniques 027: Making a Stereoscopic Photo

As I write this, I've published 20 hours of video training on the topic of 3D imaging in Photoshop. (For those who may be curious, it begins with the 5-hour Photoshop CS5 Extended One-on-One: 3D Fundamentals, about which you can learn more at lynda.com.) These movies are all about creating photorealistic 3D artwork from scratch. But what if you're not interested in 3D artwork? What if you want to create 3D photographs? Well then you're in luck, because that's precisely what this week's technique is all about.

Remember those old View-Master images? It's like that, only with glasses. Plus loads of fun and really easy.

In today's free video, I show you how to shoot two photographs---one for each of your naturally stereoscopic eyes---using a standard single-lens camera. And then I assemble them in Photoshop so that the composite image appears in everyday-average lifelike depth when viewed through a pair of red-cyan glasses, like the ones pictured below, provided by Fotolia.

3D glasses from the Fotolia image library

Red, white, and blue. What a fitting day-after-Fourth-of-July tribute! Meanwhile, here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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This Is Me in Real 3D

I'm so sorry to do this. But I get excited whenever I record a really great video. This one will be a Deke's Techniques movie for lynda.com, available (I believe) July 5th. Altogether for free. And it will document how to make a stereoscopic photograph with a single lens (i.e., standard) camera, perfect for viewing with a pair of red/blue glasses---that is to say, red on left and blue (actually cyan) on right. Get yourself such a pair and check out the following:

This is me in real 3D

This is me, btw. I imagine that some of you might want to see someone other than me, possibly a person with longer hair and more depth. But me is what you get. Me in real 3D. Read more » 

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Photoshop CS3 Mask box art

Photoshop CS3 Channels & Masks

Essentially a collection of luminance data that controls the transparency of an image, the modest alpha channel informs just about everything you do in Photoshop. and coming to terms with alpha channels (a.k.a. masks) is the most sure-fire way to boost the quality of your work in Photoshop. But masking isn’t easy. In fact, the elusive alpha channel has been described as the least understood feature in Photoshop’s enormous arsenal. Until now, that is. In Photoshop CS3 Channels and Masks, expert Deke McClelland blows the lid off the topic. Read more » 

List price: $149.95USD