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Deke's Techniques 447: Wrapping a Gradient around a Circle in Illustrator

Deke's Techniques 447: Wrapping a Gradient around a Circle in Illustrator

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke shows you how to create a color wheel in Illustrator, which in real non-Deke life does not actually have the angle gradient like the one that you have in Photoshop.

The trick, you'll see, requires creating a mathematically precise (if tediously crafted---yes, I stole the screenshot below from Deke's file rather than create it myself) gradient, then applying it as a very thick stroke (rather than a fill that would give you the wrong results).

Create a meticulous color wheel gradient

 

When you apply that gradient as a stroke to a circle, you get the desired effect (note how small the circle actually is compared to its whopping stroke, as indicated by the red line in the image below) shown here:

If you're a member of lynda.com, Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he shows you how to add the "Saturation" aspect of the traditional color wheel using blend modes.

You can spy this final result in the wild, in Deke's latest Photoshop CC 2015 One-on-One: Fundamentals as part of the chapter on color. Here it is---with some whimsical dekeEsque names for the interim colors.

If you're not a member of lynda.com and would like to check this---and the entire Deke's Techniques collection---out, you can get a free 10-day trial by signing up at lynda.com/deke. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 77: Building a Sci-Fi Temple from Scratch in Photoshop CS6 Extended 3D

Deke's Techniques 77: Building a Sci-Fi Temple from Scratch in Photoshop CS6 Extended 3D

As you might imagine, I don't actually record each and every Deke's Techniques the same day it goes live. Frankly, I wish I had the next 27 in the can, but that isn't the case. At any given moment, I'm a just few ahead. Which is to say, this thing combines shear craziness with a small degree of relevance.

I only mention this because, today, I recorded some junk and stuff for next month. With any luck, you're going to love 'em. (Not to give too much away, but my summary of the next few weeks is superheros, cars, dancing girls, and spirals. Honestly, revisit this page in August and you'll be like, "Dude, you totally spilled the beans---and I didn't even know!")

Anyway, I'm distracting you from today's technique, which is magical and rad. Because today, I show you how to create an alien 3D temple, from utter and complete nothingness, using a depth map in Photoshop Extended. Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 049: Designing an Indiana Jones Logo

Deke's Techniques 049: Designing an Indiana Jones Logo

Today, I'm offline on a personal adventure. And yet, I still manage to offer you a kind of adventure as well. In the form of Adventure Type in Photoshop.

Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 045: Creating a Synthetic Rainbow

Deke's Techniques 045: Creating a Synthetic Rainbow

This week, I show you how to make a synthetic rainbow, one that actually looks like an actual one, in Photoshop. If I were a silly little girl, I might posit the rainbow in back of a magical prancing unicorn. But I'm a silly little boy, so I set it in back of a highly aggressive, man-eating shark.

"Pardon?" I here you say. "How do you put a rainbow in back of a shark??" Watch the video and find out.

In the meantime, here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Camera Raw Does Local

In my previous article, I gave you the skinny on how you can edit batches of images in one pass with Camera Raw, adjusting the white balance and tonal distribution "globally." What I mean is that the adjustments affect the entire surface of the photograph equally. When you want to adjust the appearance of one part of the image independently of the rest, that's known as a "local" adjustment, and it's something that Photoshop obviously excels at. But Camera Raw also has local adjustment tools that you can use in advance of, or instead of, taking your image into Photoshop.

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In Camera Raw, you can use brushes and simple tools to apply local adjustments to your images with relative ease. While they may not be as robust or as flexible as the tools available to you in Photoshop, they can make quick work of many tasks, and they're not difficult to master. In this article, we'll dive in deep and explore how they work.

This article is based on Chapter 24, Adobe Camera Raw, of Deke's video course Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda. com Read more » 

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