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Deke's Techniques 471: Frame a Photo with a Path and a Custom Brush in Photoshop

Deke's Techniques 471: Frame a Photo with a Path and a Custom Brush in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke uses the custom dual brush he perfected in the last episode to trace a path in order to create a rough-edged photo frame.

A photo in a rough-hewn frame created in Photoshop

In case you missed it, here's a random close-up splotch drawn with the complex and ever-changing dual brush Deke perfected in episode 470:

A close up splotch of a custom, textured dual brush in Photoshop

(Episode 470 is a member-exclusive movie. If you're not a member of Lynda.com, you can get a free 10-day trial to check it out at lynda.com/deke. Alternatively, you can use your own textured brush or one of the Photoshop presets for this technique.)

For this week's technique, Deke starts with the new (in Photoshop CC 2015) New Guide Layout feature, to perfectly position a path created with the Rounded Rectangle tool. Then he loads the custom brush via the Brushes Preset panel and strokes the path with black. After filling in the entire rectangle, it looks like this mixture of precision and chaos:
A rounded rectangle path stroked with a textured brush in Photoshop

The photo is added in a clipped layer on top of the "frame."


And finally, Deke adds a dark Inner Glow layer effect to supply some definition around the edges:
A dark colored Inner Glow effect creates some definition to the frame.

And the result is an adjustable, yet random, frame around your photo, courtesy of Deke's Techniques. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 469: Creating a Custom Dual Brush in Photoshop

Deke's Techniques 469: Creating a Custom Dual Brush in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke shows you how to create your own custom brush in Photoshop, crafted out of two disparate splotches of paint.

Using Photoshop's Dual Brush feature inside the Brush panel, Deke combines the oil paint patch on the left with the powder blast on the right:

These two disparate splotches will become one custom paint brush in Photoshop.
And after a few tweaks, the new brush can make this textured brush stroke on-the-fly:


A dark textured brushstroke from a custom dual brush.

Along the way, you'll acquire these useful bits of dekeWisdom:

  • Choose the correct channel for your component splotches in order to get the most contrast.
  • Set the image to grayscale to give yourself a color-neutral brush.
  • Use the Trim command to quickly get rid of extraneous white areas.
  • Combine and tweak the individual brushes inside the Brushes panel.
  • Define a brush preset so you can efficiently wield your new brush again.

If you're a member of Lynda.com (or you take advantage of the free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke), Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he roughens up the brush a bit more so it can do his bidding in next week's technique. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 465: Turn Day into (Halloween) Night

Deke's Techniques 465: Turn Day into (Halloween) Night

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, we continue this year's Halloween hijinks by turning an image of a mansion in the daylight into a nighttime scene by using a Camera Raw adjustment layer.

Turn a daytime mansion into a haunted nighttime house in Photoshop

(Note that the goblins have gotten into the Lynda.com YouTube channel today, so I've linked directly to the library---which accounts for why some of our other links are temporarily haunted today as well. Just click on the arrow of the spooky black rectangle above to see the video.)

If you're a member of lynda.com, or you sign up for a free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke, Deke's got three (!) exclusive movies in which he adds the lit windows, bat-moon from last week, and (of course) a ghost in the window. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 461: Create a Bat-Faced Moon for Halloween

Deke's Techniques 461: Create a Bat-Faced Moon for Halloween

Quick note (11-27-2015): the goblins have invaded lynda.com's YouTube channel this week, so I've embedded the video straight from the lyndaLibrary. Have no fear (despite the daunting black block above), it will take you to this free movie.

In this weeeeek's freeeee Deeeeke's Techneeeeeks, the annual Halloween shenanigans begin. Of course, to Deke---lover of all things Halloween---creating a Photoshop composite in which bats make a smiley face on a creepy moon is referred to as a "timeless" technique. Yes, my darling dekeEnsteins, to Deke this is timeless:

A bat-faced moon composite with real bats in Photoshop

Hmm, on second thought, the compositing techniques you'll see during the course of this video are pretty darn timeless (within the scope of the quarter-century Photoshop has been around). You'll start with this traditional, arguably timeless, but boring moon:

The moon against a boring background

And add some creepy atmosphere with this grungy background---via good old-fashioned blend modes and a well-placed vector mask:

A grungy background for a Photoshop composite

Then you'll take these cute little bats and warp them into a familiar (but in this case, spooky) happy face:

Some adorable bats to add to our Halloween composite

So I guess, the outcome does have some fairly old-school, workhorse techniques going on.

And if you're more inclined toward Illustrator-based bat-faces, and if you're a member of lynda.com (or you sign up for a free 10-day-trial), Deke's got three exclusive movies this week in which he recreates this idea with vector-drawn bats and moon. (Ironically, creepier despite it's cartoonish nature.

A bat-faced moon created in Illustrator

Deke's creepy timeless Techniques, every week (with bonus Halloween episodes)! Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 459: Islamic Design 5 Coloring and Sculpting

Deke's Techniques 459: Islamic Design 5 Coloring and Sculpting

In this week's free Deke's Techniques we finally complete our journey to recreate this Tunisian stained-glass window, born in Africa, revealed in Amsterdam, glimpsed in London, and finished today in Illustrator (and then Photoshop).

As you recall, this creation started with a bunch of dynamic effects applied to this simple geometric construction:

Duplicating a stained-glass window in Illustrator

As of last week, we had the pattern completed:

The completed geometric pattern in Illustrator

And today, Deke will show you how to use Live Paint and dynamic strokes applied via the Appearance panel to color and then sculpt the edges of this creation.

If you're a member of Lynda.com, or you sign up for a free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke, you can see how Deke adds the final repeating pattern and light variations to finally arrive at our beautiful destination:

The final Islamic design as finished with repeating pattern and lighting effect in Photoshop.

Deke's Techniques, bringing the world to your digital doorstep. Read more » 

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