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Deke's Techniques 033: Changing the Color of a Car

Deke's Techniques 033: Changing the Color of a Car

Have you ever noticed that an awful lot of Photoshop experts spend an awful lot of time doing an awful lot of stuff to pictures of cars? As an equal-opportunity image editor, I've never quite understood the car fixation. (I own a Jeep. So, seriously, I'm lucky to put gas in the damn thing.) "But, you know," I thought one enlightened afternoon, "Maybe it's me. Maybe I'm the guy who's spending too much time on image stacks and 3D type and ink drawings and synthetic starfields and artificial wood grain and stereoscopic imagery and fake monsters. Maybe I should jump in a jalopy, roll down the windscreen, and edit a car."

And so this week I have. In fact, I do the most typical thing imaginable: I change a car's color. Only in the least typical, and most reliable, way that there is.

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Deke's Techniques 032: Capturing a Monster in Motion

Deke's Techniques 032: Capturing a Monster in Motion

Last week, I showed you how to combine three real-world animals into an entirely fictional creature. This week, I show you how to take last week's image and turn it into a plausible likeness of the one extraordinary shot that you were able to pull off before everything went all Blair Witch on you. I mean, who wouldn't extend at least a small amount of credence to the final result (below)? But you'll have to come up with one hell of a yarn about how you managed to live to tell the tale. Because, according to legend, El Terrible (as the bilingual natives call him) is so tactical and massive that he intentionally blots out the moonlight for a solid panic-inducing second before he casually crushes your rib cage and releases his appetite on your face.

The final El Terrible

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Deke's Techniques 031: Making a Fictional Creature

Deke's Techniques 031: Making a Fictional Creature

You know how folks like to worry about how Photoshop is messing with our shared notion of reality? For example, how do we know for certain that the Eiffel Tower is in Paris? Maybe someone Photoshopped it in there and we're all so dumb that we just fell for it. Seriously. I mean, like, I dunno, Jupiter. That place actually exists? As if! Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 030: Inventing Custom Starbursts

Deke's Techniques 030: Inventing Custom Starbursts

In today's technique, I show you how to create starbursts. Not those boring starbursts that contain text messages like "New!" or "Improved!" or "Pow!" But custom stars that are literally bursting at the seams, much like flares, blasts, and explosions in the real world. All with no more than a star-shaped path outline, a few effects, and Adobe Illustator.

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Deke's Techniques 029: Creating a Shooting Star in Illustrator

Deke's Techniques 029: Creating a Shooting Star in Illustrator

This week, I shift back to Illustrator. In which I explore one of the oldest---not to mention, one of my favorite---features in that particular piece of software: blends. These things were introduced waaaaaaaay back in Illustrator 88 (which came out in 1988, when I was a mere child of 26 and Guns N' Roses played its best hand with "Sweet Child O' Mine," not that I was paying all that much attention to the song thing because I was a nerd using Illustrator). Between you and me, blends were originally Illustrator's bizarre response to FreeHand's automatic gradients (which Illustrator didn't add until a few years later). These days, you probably won't use blends to make an everyday-average gradient backdrop. I mean really, what the feck's the point? But blends're useful as a sack of srewdrivers for creating all varieties of intermediate objects. Which are precisely what we need to fabricate this week's topic, shooting stars.

Assuming you're still with me, here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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