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Deke's Techniques 024: Hand Kerning Inside a Single Character of Type

Deke's Techniques 024: Kerning Within a Single Character

Hello, dekeAroos! It's Colleen here, graciously posting this week's Deke's Techniques while the Deke himself recovers from his Iron-John-meets-Woodstock experience at the Bonnaroo Music Festival. Yes, while Deke lovingly reacquaints himself with indoor plumbing, air conditioning, and clean sheets, I bring you today's technique on another marvel of modern civilization, the properly kerned character. Here's my official description from lynda.com:

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Deke's Techniques 023: Creating Synthetic Wood Grain

Deke's Techniques 023: Creating Synthetic Wood Grain

Those of you who pay attention to this site may recall that, several months ago, I solicited your suggestions for future episodes of my weekly Deke's Techniques. Well, today's episode marks the first answer to such a suggestion, one posted by dekeOnline member henrymatt. Many more are to come. (Incidentally, I'm still very much interested in your wants, hopes, and desires on this topic. Please post any suggestions you may have to that same page. Don't be a lurker; feed my Frankenstein!)

In this week's video, I show you how to create synthetic wood grain, altogether from scratch, inside Photoshop. If you watch the video---which is is as entertaining as it is educational---you'll note that I never once mention dekeOnline member henrymatt. And that's because, miraculous as it may sound, I just so happened to answer his question before he asked it! So please don't take offense, dekeOnline member henrymatt. I cannot help that my many powers include reading your mind.

Here's the official description from my buddy Colleen at lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 022: Removing People with Image Stacks

Deke's Techniques 022: Removing People with Image Stacks

Today's Deke's Techniques explains how to magically remove unwanted people from a photograph. Crazy as it may sound, you can take anything that moves in a scene---a person, a car, or even a distended orangutan head---and make it disappear into thin air. Suddenly a crowded plaza or distant vista becomes altogether vacant.

This technique requires two things: First, you'll need to shoot several exposures of the scene so that Photoshop can compare the stuff that moves to the stuff that doesn't. And second, you'll need Photoshop Extended. Either CS3, CS4, or CS5 will do just fine; but you have to own the Extended version of the software to pull this technique off.

Assuming you have both of these, the tool of choice is the image stack. Like a super-powered blend mode, an image stack takes a smart object-full of images and runs a kind of statistical analysis on every pixel across multiple images. Which is to say, it blends the similar pixels one way and the different ones another. So an image stack either wipes out or highlights differences.

Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 021: Assembling a Flawless Panorama

Deke's Techniques 021: Assembling a Flawless Panorama

It's tempting to dismiss stitched panoramas as a kind of trendy fad, one that passed about the same time that Adobe finally got its act in gear with the current version of Photomerge. But I see panoramas very much in the realm of ongoing relevance, and for two reasons. First, the obvious: You can build an image with roughly the same proportions as human eyesight, thus permitting the viewer to fully immerse in your photograph. Second, and more importantly (because there's nothing that says these things have to be wide), you can assemble a higher number of pixels than your camera can otherwise capture. For example, a collection of 12-megapixel shots can grow upwards of 30 megapixels---even after cropping---enough to measure at least 3 feet wide (or 3 feet tall, if you prefer) at 267 pixels per inch.

Photoshop's Photomerge command is easy enough to use. But getting flawless results out of it is another thing. It's less a matter of Photoshop wizardry---there's not a whole lot you can do to control Photomerge's automated behavior---and more one of capturing the best scene while behind the camera. And because panoramas are best suited to grand vistas and other location shots, you may have just one chance to get it right. Which is what this video is ultimately about.

Here's the official description from lynda.com: Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 020: Creating a Talk Show-Style Curtain

Deke's Techniques 020: Creating a Talk Show-Style Curtain

This week, I show you how to create what I'm calling a "talk show-style" curtain. In my defense, I admit that many talk shows do not have curtains, and many non-talk shows do have curtains. But this is the kind of curtain that Johnny Carson had, back when JC was king of late-night TV. You know, back when there was such a thing.

I employed this very effect for the background of my recent 3D Pie Chart movies. But the curtain exists entirely independently of its foreground. By way of proof, here's the official description from lynda.com's Colleen Wheeler: Read more » 

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