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Cookin' with Camera Raw #3: Getting Selective

In my previous article, I showed you how the Adjustment Brush allows you to localize adjustments and constrain them to specific parts of an image by painting. Adobe Camera Raw (also known as ACR) provides a second way to adjust specific parts of an image: It lets you adjust color, saturation, and luminosity according to predefined subjective regions. For example, you might isolate the blues and aquas of a sky to emphasize just those colors, or everything else. These adjustment capabilities are aimed primarily at color correction. But they can also be used creatively, as pictured below.

Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced, Chapter 24, Adobe Camera Raw

In this article, we'll take a close look at the ins and outs of working with the HSL/Grayscale panel and the Targeted Adjustment tool. Together, these features allow you to emphasize color, tone, and contrast within an image, as well as make expressive black-and-white conversions that far exceed what you can get by simply zeroing-out saturation.

This article is based on Chapter 24, Adobe Camera Raw, of Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda. com Read more » 

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Camera Raw Does Local

In my previous article, I gave you the skinny on how you can edit batches of images in one pass with Camera Raw, adjusting the white balance and tonal distribution "globally." What I mean is that the adjustments affect the entire surface of the photograph equally. When you want to adjust the appearance of one part of the image independently of the rest, that's known as a "local" adjustment, and it's something that Photoshop obviously excels at. But Camera Raw also has local adjustment tools that you can use in advance of, or instead of, taking your image into Photoshop.

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In Camera Raw, you can use brushes and simple tools to apply local adjustments to your images with relative ease. While they may not be as robust or as flexible as the tools available to you in Photoshop, they can make quick work of many tasks, and they're not difficult to master. In this article, we'll dive in deep and explore how they work.

This article is based on Chapter 24, Adobe Camera Raw, of Deke's video course Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda. com Read more » 

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Cookin' with Camera Raw: The Basics and Beyond

Adobe Camera Raw, also known as ACR, is a plug-in utility that works with Photoshop, Adobe Bridge, and a few other Adobe programs. It's a kind of pre-processor that allows you to edit your photos non-destructively, meaning there's nothing you can do to your images in Camera Raw that can't be undone. I've called Camera Raw a pre-processor, because many people use it to prepare images for editing in Photoshop. But its feature set is rich enough to produce finished images without ever taking them into Photoshop. It can adjust exposure, correct contrast, enhance colors, and straighten and crop as needed. You can even adjust certain areas independently of others, correct for lens distortion, and add grain and vignetting effects. What's more, you don't pay a dime extra for it: Camera Raw comes bundled along with Adobe Bridge when you buy Photoshop.

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Truth is, once you master Camera Raw, you'll probably use Photoshop less. In this article, we'll look at the basics of Camera Raw and move beyond that point to work with White Balance and tonal adjustments. And you'll see some of the capabilities and workflow advantages of working with Camera Raw, including automatic White Balance, automatic toning, snapshots, and synchronizing images.

This article is based on Chapter 24, Adobe Camera Raw, of Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda.com. Read more » 

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Advanced Sharpening Techniques (or "Close to the Edge"), Part Deux

In the previous article, we looked at the application of two mainstay sharpening commands in Photoshop: Unsharp Mask and Smart Sharpen. These commands may sometimes seem like magic, but under the hood they're performing three practical jobs: edge-detection, blurring, and masking. You already know about blurring and masking, and in this article, you'll see how to use the edge-detection capabilities of the Emboss and High Pass filters to create hand-tuned sharpening effects that can take you further than Smart Sharpen and USM in certain special cases.

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We'll also look at how a Remove option called Motion Blur can address camera shake, along with a little-known sharpening tool that Adobe fixed without fanfare in Photoshop CS5.

This article is based on Chapter 15, Sharpening Details, from Deke's comprehensive video course Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda.com. Read more » 

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Add the Definitive Edge with Sharpening

Photoshop is adept at detecting "edges." By which I mean, areas in your photographs where luminance levels shift rapidly. When Photoshop spots an edge, it can enhance its contrast, giving the impression of greater sharpness. What sharpening can't do, of course, is go back in time and readjust the focus in your camera. In other words, it can't fix blurry images. But, what sharpening can do is take a well-focused image and make it look even crisper. In this in-depth article, we'll look at the fundamentals and core techniques of sharpening.

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It might surprise you to know that there are five Sharpen commands in Photoshop's Filter menu alone---not to mention related filters such as High Pass and Emboss---making sharpening the most predominant filter effect in the application. Photoshop's wide array of sharpening options gives you an enormous range of control and flexibility.

In this article, we'll look at the fundamentals and core techniques for sharpening images---specifically, how to apply the right amount of sharpening while minimizing noise and other artifacts.

This article is based on Chapter 15, Sharpening Details, from Deke's comprehensive video course Photoshop CS5 One-on-One: Advanced for lynda.com. Read more » 

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