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Deke's Techniques 428: Auto-Blending Different Depths-of-Field in Photoshop

Blending Different Depths of Field in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques movie, Emperor Photoshopus Dekian shows you how to blend two different depths of field, taken from a museum display case at the Roman Baths in the aptly named Bath, England. The result is the in-focus revelation of both the text in the display, and the coins that are the real focus of the exhibit. Tangentially, it will also make clear Deke's love of all things Ancient Rome.

In the video, you'll see how Deke uses Photoshop's ability to stack and blend layers to mix the important information from this placard, that was placed at the back of the display case:

Text in focus

 

With this detail from Phillip and Otacilia's coins that were mounted on wires coming to the front of the glass:

Coins in focus

 

To create this composite, in which all the important details are in focus (and some atmospheric bits still retain their original depth of field:

A blend of two depths of field make all the salient information in focus

Check out the video to see how Emperor Deke fine-tunes the process (and thereby saves you some trial-and-error of your own). And if you'd like to check out other treasures from the museum of Deke's Techniques, you can get a free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 570: Make Wildly Purple Supervillain Eyes in Photoshop

Deke's Techniques 570: Make Wildly Purple Supervillain Eyes in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke once again turns to the Doctor Strange movie and digitally recreates the painful-looking purple eye condition from the movie's main villain, Kaecilius.

You too can turn your unsuspecting friends into menacing mystics, thanks to the transformative power of the Photoshop Arts.

Deke's future villain comes to us from the Dreamstime image library. Sure, the dude is sketchy looking, but not quite destroyer-of-the-world sketchy.

A hooded man from Dreamstime.com/deke.php

First, Deke cleans the eyebrows away with the healing brush. Then he brings in the purple with a solid color layer, some added noise, and a bit of Gaussian blur. He then limits the "makeup" to the eye region by employing the Quick Selection tool and a bit of hand brushing inside a layer mask. Definitely climbing the scale of evil here.

Purple eyes Photoshop style

If you're a subscribed acolyte of the Lynda.com library, Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he adds the painful skin crystallization around the eyes, to truly reveal your subject's descent into the darkness.

The final Doctor Strange inspired eye makeup

If you're not a member, you can get a free 10-day trial by heading to lynda.com/deke and signing up. This unlocks all the wizardry of Deke's Techniques, plus all the other secrets of the Lynda library. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 568: Creating a Doctor Strange-Like Mirror World in Photoshop

Deke's Techniques 568: Creating a Doctor Strange-Like Mirror World in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, our own strange magician, known as Deke, recreates an effect from the visually stunning Doctor Strange movie.

You can imagine what it's like going to the movies with Deke and having him mentally note all the things he wants to try when he gets back to Photoshop. In this case, it's the twisted mirror world effect of the cityscapes in the film.

Imagery from Doctor Strange

Using smart objects and vector masks, Deke is able to turn this photo of the Hong Kong skyline (courtesy of Dreamstime):

Hong Kong skyline via Dreamstime.com/deke.php

Into this bent and refracted world:

Mirror world

If you're a member of Lynda.com and you follow Deke's in exploiting Photoshop's smart objects, Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he demonstrates how to swap out your Hong Kong for, say Shanghai...

Impossible higways

or Chicago...

Chicago mirror world

or whichever mirror world you want to create. With your mind (and Photoshop).

If you're not a member, you can get a 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke with which you can watch this exclusive movie, the entire collection of Deke's Techniques, or anything your visually creative mind can find in the Lynda.com library. 

Deke's Techniques, twisting your world around each week!

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Deke's Techniques 566: An MC Escher-esque Hex Pattern in Illustrator

Deke's Techniques 566: An MC Escher-esque Hex Pattern in Illustrator

Greetings from La Paz, Mexico, my dekeOmpañeros. In this week's free Deke's Techniques movie, you'll see how Deke finally puts his MC Escher-inspirted shape from last week into a seamlessly repeating pattern in Illustrator.

The main trick Deke shows you here is how to figure out the size of your hexagon based on your desired base shape. Then you plug those values into Illustrator and voila---in Deke's case---interlocking dancing troglodytes.

An Escher-inspired hex pattern in Adobe Illustrator

If you're a member of Lynda.com, Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he shows you how to create some matching pattern variations. If you're not a member, you can get a free 10-day trial by going to lynda.com/deke.

Isolate one part of the tesslation with a different color

Meanwhile, this is what's going on around here. Deke finally unlocked one of his life's sought-after achievements. Whale sharks!


Whale sharks in La Paz

Yes, we are thankful for big fish! Flying home tomorrow to be thankful for our families (and yours), as well.

Hope your days are full of peace, thanks, and wonders of the universe. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 564: Creating an MC Escher-esque Shape in Illustrator

Deke's Techniques 564: Creating an MC Escher-esque Shape in Illustrator

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke shows you how to create an interlocking shape that will eventually become a hex patterned homage to MC Escher.

Using Adobe Illustrator and a handy hexagonal guide, Deke shows you how to create dynamic rotations for each side of the hexagon, not only ensuring that your image will eventually interlock with itself, but allow you to change your mind about the shape down the road.

A hex shape interlocking with itself

So, if Deke's troglodytes aren't your up of tea, you could do something closer to Escher's clowns (tessellating clowns are even scarier!)

Escher's interlocking clowns

Or adapt the techniques to a quad pattern to make something like these lovely calming fishes:

Interlocking MC Escher fish

If you're a member of lynda.com, Deke's got an exclusive follow-up movie this week in which he shows you how to make sure your subjects rotate with all their (crazy) detail intact. (Hey, are those dudes wearing monocles?) If you're not a member, you can get a free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke.

Detail on an interlocking pattern in Adobe Illustrator

And next week we'll see how it all comes together in a mesmerizing tessellating pattern.

Deke's Techniques, showing you how to spin your absurd world in complete interlocking precision. Read more » 

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