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Deke's Techniques 428: Auto-Blending Different Depths-of-Field in Photoshop

Blending Different Depths of Field in Photoshop

In this week's free Deke's Techniques movie, Emperor Photoshopus Dekian shows you how to blend two different depths of field, taken from a museum display case at the Roman Baths in the aptly named Bath, England. The result is the in-focus revelation of both the text in the display, and the coins that are the real focus of the exhibit. Tangentially, it will also make clear Deke's love of all things Ancient Rome.

In the video, you'll see how Deke uses Photoshop's ability to stack and blend layers to mix the important information from this placard, that was placed at the back of the display case:

Text in focus

 

With this detail from Phillip and Otacilia's coins that were mounted on wires coming to the front of the glass:

Coins in focus

 

To create this composite, in which all the important details are in focus (and some atmospheric bits still retain their original depth of field:

A blend of two depths of field make all the salient information in focus

Check out the video to see how Emperor Deke fine-tunes the process (and thereby saves you some trial-and-error of your own). And if you'd like to check out other treasures from the museum of Deke's Techniques, you can get a free 10-day trial at lynda.com/deke. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 656: Create a Concentric Ring Logo in Adobe Illustrator

Greetings from the lovely north California coast. We're traveling with all three large boy-men and a small tree this week toward our Thanksgiving destination in Mendocino county, one of the loveliest, unspoiledest places in all of the loveliness that is my home state. Here's the view from our current dining table at which I am working in peace while Deke and our three boys went out foraging for groceries:

Sea Ranch view

Here's the small tree we're traveling with for reasons that may or may not become clear:

Traveling tree likes Sea Ranch

And here's this week's free Deke's Techniques subject, a fun Illustrator interwoven logo suggested by Facebook friend of Deke, Tamzid Hasan.

Concentric circle logo in Illustrator

If you're a member of Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning, you can check out the exclusive movie this week in which Deke turns that initial pattern into a continuous octagonal creation:

Concentric circle octagon logo in Adobe Illustrator

Deke's Techniques, hoping that you have as many things for which to be grateful. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 654: Op Art Experiment 3a: Volumetric waves

Deke's Techniques 654: Op Art Experiment 3a: Volumetric waves

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke does his third set of experiments in digitally created Op Art. Inspired by a work in the Dreamstime image library, he set out in Adobe Illustrator to create this undulating pattern.

An undulating waves pattern in Adobe Illustrator

Of course, any good eye-stimulating, brain-stirring, possibly headache-inducing piece of Op Art begins with planning, especially if you're the math loving Deke. So in order to insure this experiment results in a seamlessly repeating pattern, he plots out his intentions first.

Planning a seamless patterin in Illustrator

The actual piece begins with these two simple lines...

Two simple lines destined to become a seamless wave pattern

...which are then subject to the power of Illustrator's Transform commands, and ultimately exploded into that thing that's still waving at the corner of your eye two paragraphs above.

For those of you who are members of Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning, Deke's got an exclusive movie this week in which he manipulates the initial pattern into an "optimistic" (Deke's word, no idea what he's talking about) monochrome version, aka Op Art experiment 3b: Rolling Windows.

Variations on the rolling wave pattern in Illustrator

If your eyes can stand it, and you want to see the previous experiments, check out Deke's Techniques Episode 189: Op Art Experiment 1a: Inflated Checkers...

Op Art experiment 1a

... and Episode 201: Op Art Experiment 2a: Undulating Pattern

Op Art Experiment 2A

Deke's Techniques, experimenting in eye bending art. Read more » 

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Deke's Techniques 652: Drawing HAL 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey in Illustrator (in 2017)

Deke's Techniques 652: Drawing HAL 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey in Illustrator (in 2017)

In this week's free Deke's Techniques episode, Deke recreates the AI antagonist HAL 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey inside...AI!

HAL 9000 recreated in Adobe Illustrator

In case you were wondering, the best way to build a computer in Illustrator is with nothing but circles. In fact, this project does just that, starting with this innocuous black circle.
Start with an innocuous black circle

To which is added this slightly more sinister red circle<

A slightly more sinister red circle

And an increasingly menacing bright red circle

Red menacing circle

All of the above are then combined with a Blend operation in Illustrator to make this gradient effect:

Circles are blended in Illustrator to make a custom gradient

And then another circle with another gradient becomes HAL's ever-observant pupil

The pupil of HAL 9000 in Adobe Illustrator

Then Deke creates custom gradients for the outer edge of the eye.

The outer edge created with a custom gradient

And then the inner edge:
The inner edge created by a custom gradient

And if you're a member of Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning, you can see how Deke added a few more carefully colored circles to create the volumetric lighting effect in the final creation of HAL 9000's eye.

Deke's Techniques, taking you along on Adobe Illustrator artificial intelligence Odysseys. Read more » 

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Deeeeek's Techneeeeeeeks 647: Dr. Frankenstein's Monstrous Emoji

Deeeeek's Techneeeeeeeks 647: Dr. Frankenstein's Monstrous Emoji

In this week's Halloween-inspired Deeeek's Techneeeeeeeks episodes, Deke celebrates his favorite holiday by creating Dr. Frankenstein's emoji in Adobe Illustrator. And because it's Deke and it's Halloween, the entire project takes up (count 'em) five videos. Trick or treat? You decide. I think he's pretty charming (meaning both the creator and the monster in this case).

Frankenstein emoji created in Adobe Illustrator

He begins with the Angry emoji he created in episode 500. (If you'd like to follow along with this transformation, you can grab the starting file here.)

Angry emoji created in Adobe Illustrator

In the first unlocked video, Deke replaces the universal swatches from that earlier project with new analogous shades of green. It goes without saying this makes a great case for using swatches that you can swap out globally in a few simple moves. Then he manipulates the angry emoji's one remaining eye (no wonder he's angry) into a couple of Frankaproppriate orbs.

Creating eyes for the Frankenstein emoji

If you're a member of Lynda.com/LinkedIn Learning, check out the second movie in which he builds the eyebrows and eyelids of his monstrous (but adorable) creation.

Lids and brows added to the Frankenstein emoji in Illustrator

In the third movie, he'll show you how he created Frank's signature flattop hairdo.

Frankenstein's emoji gets his signature flattop hairdo.

Next, see how to add the scar and mouth, both of which start life as straight simple lines transformed in Illustrator.

Adding a scar and mouth to the Frankenstein emoji in Illustrator

And finally, Deke affixes the signature neck bolts, so that you can attach Frank's head to the body of your monstrous messages.

Adding Frankenstein emoji's signature neck bolts in Illustrator

Deke's Techniques, imbuing even emojis with new life. Happy Halloween, trick-or-dekesters! Read more » 

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