Coloring Your Mandala Pattern in Photoshop CC 2019

770 Coloring your mandala pattern

Hello, my deke-A-las. In this week’s free Deke’s Techniques episode, Deke finishes up his Photoshop mandala project by showing you how to add color to your design via some custom color gradient layers.

He begins where he left off last week, with this black and white design created using Photoshop’s new mandala painting feature.

The black and white mandala pattern created in Photoshop CC 2019

Next, a custom radial gradient clipped to the main design layer adds some initial color.

Mandala pattern with a layer of color applied to white pattern

Then he uses a different radial gradient applied to the background layer, which adds another, well, layer of color.

A different radial gradient applied to the background

And if you’re a member of LinkedIn Learning (or Lynda.com), Deke’s got an exclusive movie this week in which he shows you how he both applied color and a radial blur to the “dots” layer of the design, resulting in the final image you see up top.

And interestingly, if you follow Deke on Facebook, you’ll have noticed that last week he decided he liked the black and white version the best. While you may not agree (and Deke may change his mind again), all the color added this week comes in a completely reversible adjustment layer package, so you can change your mind (or your gradients) as often as Deke does.

Deke’s Techniques, custom coloring your world and your designs, or not!

Previous entry:Painting a Free-Form Mandala Pattern in Photoshop CC 2019

Comments

  • looking, please, to find a classic Deke Technique. namely, the video lesson where maestro McClelland converts a color Adobe Illustrator file to grayscale “the right way,” as it were. that is, rather than use the Edit/Edit Colors/Convert to Grayscale command, he ... well, can’t remember exactly—but with just a few extra selections & commands the final illustration popped off the screen! (compared to the one-step “convert to grayscale” method, the grays were much more striking) ... thanks ... note to other Deke fans: if you haven’t seen this technique or know how to do it, you may want to check it out—someday you may very well find it valuable!
  • Nice post.

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