Martini Hour 043, In Which Colleen Experiences Photoshop Experts in 3D

Sometimes a hat is just a hat. Unless it’s a hat drawn during a lesson with two amazing masters of Photoshop 3D, Bert Monroy and Corey Barker. A lesson that took place in the VIP lounge of our Martini Hour Las Vegas Extravaganza. Then, said hat is a testament to the ability of good teachers to teach highly visual subjects in a completely audio format. And the improved 3D abilities of Photoshop CS4. Oh, and Corey taught me to draw a wine bottle, too. Because, you know, he gets me.

Hold on to your ugly, if three-dimentional, hats folks, here’s what we have this week:

Corey starts by showing me how to quickly create a 3D wine bottle (suprisingly simple, really) and then we go on to discuss what we could do with it. Bert then gives away some of his guru-magic by showing how a textured bump map immediately becomes a typographical landscape. Listen as we toy with the ugly hat and wrap the Martini Hour logo around it. I have to tell you, when you have experts like Bert and Corey in the house, 3D is suddenly less daunting. Because, you know, Photoshop in only two dimensions is so “yesterday.”

Want to experience a coupla amazing gurus in three dimensions? Here’s the regular-quality (128kbps) audio file. You can stream, or for best results, right-click and choose Download or Save. For you audiophiles out there, here’s the link to the high-quality (320kbps) version. Be sure to download, don’t stream. And bask in the VIP exclusivity.

This week’s toast is to learning, learning, learning, whether it be 3D or new vocabulary.

And don’t forget the usual blather: Subscribe via iTunes. Call 1-888-dekepod with your questions. (That’s 1-888-335-3763.)

Thanks again to all those who made our live show so fun and entertaining. Stay tuned for more live and lively fun!

Next entry:Photoshop Forensics in France Contest Winners!

Previous entry:Photoshop Top 40, Feature #19: Luminance Blending

Comments

  • Illustrator Question

    I’ve been struggling all morning with a rotated object in Illustrator that has a gradient applied.  I want to tuck the last copied rotation behind the original shape, and if I were doing this in Photoshop it would be easy.  But in Illustrator if I trim the shape to make it appear as though a portion of it is tucked behind the first shape, the gradient changes its appearance it makes a mess.  Here’s a link to an image showing what I’m referring to

  • Martini Hour

    This remarkable racer is in startling contrast to the small 4-cylinder sports car that Dr. Ferdinand Porsche began producing in 1950. A very sophisticated racing machine designed for the highest levels of competition, it has a horizontally opposed 12-cylinder, 4.5-litre engine capable of producing 500 horsepower.

  • New technologies like photo

    New technologies like photoshop, 3d, animation adds spice to entertainment and fills the essence of beauty in every single art. Many are unaware of how this is done and the hard work that artists do for the sake of art. Most of us in this condition, due to economic crisis many are striving hard to put up something like this for business and at the same time fulfilling and satisfying your passion for art industry development, but it always has the question of how? cutting back on expenditures,that happens a few pennies or dollars at a time. For instance, one of the biggest variable costs that you can cut back on is vehicle expenses. You can find ways to save on what you spend on your car, and the first thing to do is save money on gas. If you alter your driving habits, for instance staying to the speed limit and not accelerating or braking too fast, and keeping up on regular maintenance will not only maintain vehicles longer, but a better running vehicle will also be more fuel efficient. With this simple idea we can achieve something and pursue our career and wants in life.

  • Mordy!

    This is a perfect example of why a real “tucked” shape feature (in which one shape can be both in front of and behind another shape) would be useful in Illustrator.

    Hopefully, my subject line will cause fellow lynda.com trainer Mordy Golding to take notice of this post and invent some approach that will simultaneously solve your problem and apologize for Illustrator’s shortcomings.

    (I’ve been arguing for this feature for years.)

  • Further proof

    That you should not drink while driving.

  • Got it to work

    Hi Deke,

    Thanks for your reply grin  I kept at it and eventually got it to work using “divide” with pathfinder by superimposing another shape on top.  The gradient miraculously remained the same within the divided pieces.  Not sure if this was just a happy glitch or whether it will continue to work properly each time I repeat the experiment.

    I find Illustrator a lot more unpredictable and glitchy than Photoshop.  ie: I was using the star tool, pressing up and down arrows along with the Ctrl & Alt keys and somehow managed to get the star tool to overlap the strokes, creating some beautiful stars with overlapping strokes that had some extra complexity.  But for the life of me I have no idea what combination of keystrokes I pressed to make this happen.  I tried to repeat what I thought I had pressed, but without the same results.  I also tried the same thing on a Mac and again by pressing these keys in random order was able to recreate these kinds of stars, but there didn’t seem to be a specific set of keystrokes, it seems to occur randomly.  I looked online and all descriptions I found did not include this overlapping star.  Is there a specific set of keystrokes to create these kind of overlapping stars?  Here’s what I’m refering to:

  • Great!!

    Good and informative post!! I am glad to read this post.

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  • Yep….

    Thanks for the post man…it was very great article….I am having the sports car…so I am driving it fast in the highway…..oops…thanks for the post.

    Great work

  • Great post!

    Thanks for the information

  • thanxs

    Thanxs for these wonderful and knowledge able comments,its help me in future to find my real path.Racing engines

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