Creating an Old Monster-Movie Poster in Photoshop

Deke's Techniques by Deke McClelland

In this week’s free Deeeek’s Techniques episode, Deke enhances our “candy keeper” (the guardian of your giant bowl of candy for trick or treaters that we created last week) into a full-fledged horror movie poster, notably by adding creepy creases and eerie edges to the project.

You’ll recall, last week, we left the project like this:

Candy keeper file after last week's episodes

Cool sure, but not legit enough to guard our full-size unattended candy bars from the most dedicatedly acquisitive of trick-or-treaters.

To add the edges and folds, Deke enlists the help of our friends at Dreamstime.com (about which you can learn more and get deals here). First, using the aged edges featured in this image:

edges from dreamstime.com/deke.php

And then adding creases (combined with some heavy duty Calculations manipulation) from this creation:
creases courtesy of www.dreamstime.com/deke.php

Of course, no project that is specifically designed to scare the kids off from stealing all the candy is fully realized until you add menacing half-tone dots, which Deke demonstrates in this LinkedIn Learning (Lynda.com) exclusive movie:

skeleton with half-tone dots applied

And because Deke doesn’t feel like Halloween has been fully graphically celebrated without at least two extra movies, he’s got two more exclusive movies for members this week. In the second, he shows you how he enhanced the word Haunted to look particularly, well, haunted.

the word Haunted enhanced

And in the third, he shows you how he magically makes the letters on the poster edges go outside the supposedly aged edge effects. How would they do that? Spooky magic, of course. And the fact that in Photoshop “looking cool” transcends logic, especially in dekeOphoria.

Deke’s Techniques, where ghouls and goblins wait all year to be celebrated.

Next entry:Naming an Adjustment Layer as You Create It

Previous entry:Creating a Creepy Candy Keeper in Photoshop

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