Deke’s Techniques 382: Drawing a Vector Flower in Illustrator

In this week’s free Deke’s Techniques episode, Deke shows you how to start with a simple circle (you don’t even have to draw it yourself, just command Illustrator to do so) and transform it into a dynamically effective multi-colored, multi-petaled flower.

Along the way, you’ll see some useful Illustrator tricks: letting Illustrator calculate things for you by entering a mathematical equation into a dialog box field, setting the rasterization of your effects higher than Illustrator deems initially necessary, and resetting the Layers panel so that you can actually see the contents in the layer thumbnail. All good stuff.

But what struck me most about this project was that the interim steps to creating the flower seemed like useful things to know in and of themselves. Of course, you can watch the movie to get the particulars, but check out my snapshots from along the way:

Create concentric circles with Illustrator's Transform Effect

 

Illustrators Bloat command used on concentric circles

Nautilus shape created with Illustrator Transform effects

More anchor points equals more bloat

Create flower petals dynamically in Illustrator

Changing part of the gradient creates an odd glow

Center button created with concentric offset gradients

Final effect of a vector flower created with Illustrator dynamic effects

For those of you who are members of lynda.com, Deke’s got an exclusive movie this week in which he shows you how to add a stroke to this creation for an entirely different feel.

The same flower with stroked petals for a different effect

If you’re not a member of lynda.com and would like to check this and the other 300+ Deke’s Techniques out, you can get a free week’s trial by signing up at lynda.com/deke. Flower power to the Illustrator people!

Next entry:Deke’s Techniques 384: Creating an Origami Flower in Illustrator

Previous entry:Deke’s Techniques 380: Clearing the Recently Used Fonts List from InDesign

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